Lined Paper #1034
 Light  CC BY-SA 3.0

I know there is one here already, but this is sexy!

Source Gjermund Gustavsen

 More Textures
Background pattern 268 #2066
 Dark  CC 0

Remixed from a drawing in 'Kulturgeschichte der Deutschen im Mittelalter' Franz von Loeher, 1891. The unit tile can be had by selecting the rectangle in Inkscape and using shift-alt-i

Source Firkin

Retro Circles Background 8 #435
 Dark  CC 0

Retro Circles Background 8

Source GDJ

Seamless arrow pattern remix #2528
 Dark  CC 0

Similar to original, but without gaps in between the arrows. This seamless pattern was created from a rectangular tile. To get the tile, select the rectangle in Inkscape and use shift+alt+i.

Source Firkin

Micro Carbon #7
 Carbon  CC BY-SA 3.0

Three shades of gray makes this pattern look like a small carbon fiber surface. Great readability even for small fonts.

Source Atle Mo

Prismatic Polka Dots 3 No Background #528
 Noise  CC 0

Prismatic Polka Dots 3 No Background

Source GDJ

Decorative divider 222 #2208
 Dark  CC 0

Remixed from a drawing in 'A Girl in Ten Thousand', Elizabeth Meade, 1896.

Source Firkin

Stone Wall & Yellow #1552
 Stone  CC 0

Incoming catena. Stone & well. CC0 texture.

Source Unknow

Stone Granite #1292
 Stone  CC 0

ZeroCC tileabel stone granite texture, edited from pixabay. CC0

Source Sojan Janso

Parquet flooring pattern #2427
 Red  CC 0

A seamless pattern recreated from an image on Pixabay. It is reminiscent of parquet flooring and is formed from a square tile, which can be recovered in Inkscape by selecting the ungrouped rectangle and using shift-alt-I together.

Source Firkin

Real Carbon [email protected] #287
 Carbon  CC BY-SA 3.0

Carbon fiber is never out of fashion, so here is one more style for you.

Source Alfred Lee

Diamonds Are [email protected] #184
 Diamond  CC BY-SA 3.0

Sharp diamond pattern. A small 24x18px tile.

Source Tom Neal

Background pattern green #2027
 Green  CC 0

Remixed from a design seen in 'Burghley. The Life of William Cecil', William Charlton, 1857. The tile this is based on can be had by selecting the rectangle in Inkscape and using shift+alt+i.

Source Firkin

Skewed Print #819
 Dark  CC BY-SA 3.0

An interesting dark spotted pattern at an angle.

Source Hendrik Lammers

Dust #919
 Light  CC BY-SA 3.0

Another one bites the dust! Boyah.

Source Dominik Kiss

Nistri #773
 Stripes  CC BY-SA 3.0

No idea what Nistri means, but it’s a crisp little pattern nonetheless.

Source Markus Reiter

Street Art Pattern #1196
 Concrete  CC BY-SA 3.0

Looks as if it's spray painted on the wall. You can be sure that this pattern will seamlessly fill your backgrounds on web pages.

Source V. Hartikainen

Floral pattern 18 #1716
 Dark  CC 0

A pattern formed from repeated instances of corner decoration 8. To get the basic tile select the rectangle in Inkscape and use shift+alt+i

Source Firkin

Sakura Blossoms Background #389
 Noise  CC 0

Sakura Blossoms Background

Source GDJ

Wellington boots pattern #1900
 Colorful  CC 0

CC0 and seamless wellington boot pattern.

Source SliverKnight

Glassy Orange Pattern #1315
 Orange  CC BY-SA 3.0

This pattern comes in orange, and it looks as if it is "made of glass".

Source V. Hartikainen

[email protected] #658
 Paper  CC BY-SA 3.0

Nicely crafted paper pattern, although a bit on the large side (500x593px).

Source Blaq Annabiosis

Leafy pattern 13 #1758
 Dark  CC 0

Derived from a drawing in 'At home', J. Sowerby, J. Crane and T. Frederick, 1881.

Source Firkin

[email protected] #896
 Light  CC BY-SA 3.0

Could remind you a bit of those squares in Super Mario Bros, yeh?

Source Jeff Wall

Fabric of Squares #1095
 Light  CC BY-SA 3.0

As far as fabric patterns goes, this is quite crisp.

Source Heliodor Jalba

Stone Wall & Dark #1549
 Stone  CC 0

Incoming catena. Stone & well. CC0 texture.

Source Unknow

Binding [email protected] #1137
 Light  CC BY-SA 3.0

Light gray version of the Binding pattern that looks a bit like fabric.

Source Newbury

Purty [email protected] #678
 Wood  CC BY-SA 3.0

You know you love wood patterns, so here’s one more.

Source Richard Tabor